Title

Iliac Screw Fixation Revisited: Improved Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes Using a Modified Iliac Screw Fixation Technique.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-23-2021

Publication Title

Clin Spine Surg

Keywords

washington; seattle; swedish neuro

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective study.

OBJECTIVE: To describe the modified iliac screw (mILS) technique and compare it to other spinopelvic fixation techniques in terms of wound healing complications, hardware prominence, and failure.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The traditional entry point of an iliac screw often causes postoperative gluteal pain from the prominent screw head. The use of an offset connector also adds a point of weakness to the construct. By choosing a different screw entry point offset connectors can be avoided, and the screw head itself is less prominent, thereby reducing postoperative discomfort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of adult patients undergoing lumbopelvic fixation (LPF) between January 2014 and June 2019. Patients were grouped into 1 of 3 groups based on the technique of pelvic fixation: S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw, traditional iliac screw (tILS), and mILS. The primary outcome parameter was the minimal distance from screw head to skin. Secondary outcome parameters were instrumentation loosening/failure, adjacent level fractures, pseudoarthrosis, and medial or lateral iliac screw perforation.

RESULTS: A total of 190 patients undergoing LPF were included in the following 3 groups: mILS group (n=113), tILS group (n=40), and S2AI group (n=37). The mean minimal distance from screw head to skin in the mILS group was 31.3 mm compared with 23.7 mm in the tILS group (P

CONCLUSIONS: The mILS technique is an acceptable alternative for LPF, offering the benefits of iliac screw fixation while avoiding offset connectors and screw prominence complications associated with tILS.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.

Clinical Institute

Neurosciences (Brain & Spine)

Department

Neurosciences

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